Farmer’s Market #3

Leica MP | Leica Summicron-M 35mm f/2 ASPH. | Kodak Portra 160

Leica MP | Leica Summicron-M 35mm f/2 ASPH. | Kodak Portra 160

Advertisements

The LA Gallery

Normally, I only cherry-pick the images I post on this blog, because this is not a travel blog, but rather about photography itself. However, when I went through the pictures I took last year in Los Angeles, in particular the ones I had taken with the Leica MP and a roll of Kodak Portra 160, I thought although they will never win a price, they are still a good reflection of what LA feels like. So here you have it.

All images are untouched (only one is leveled, because as usual I couldn’t hold my camera straight :)).

Farmers Market #2

Farmers Market in Los Angeles has a plethora of photographic motives. So if you ever visit LA, I would highly recommend you stop by. Not only for photographs, but also to just sit down in one of the many kiosks and have a sip of ice tea and watch the sellers in their booths and the people strolling by.

Leica MP | Leica Summicron-M 35mm f/2 ASPH. | Kodak Portra 160

Leica MP | Leica Summicron-M 35mm f/2 ASPH. | Kodak Portra 160

Farmers Market

It was my last day in LA. I had already checked out of my hotel, but thought that on my way to the airport I had to stop by some more “must-dos” in LA before I head back to Germany.

Among them: Farmers Market. It’s a bunch of small kiosks thrown together, mostly offering fresh food and snacks. I loved the smell and the colors there. I also had my M Monochrom with me, but quite frankly (and no surprise, really) none of those B&W pictures cut it for me. So I had to wait almost a year until I had finished the roll of Kodak Portra 160 that was still sitting in my Leica MP to discover the color versions of the photos I took back in April 2016 in LA – which I liked a lot more than the black and white images.

Leica MP | Leica Summicron-M 35mm f/2 ASPH. | Kodak Portra 160

Leica MP | Leica Summicron-M 35mm f/2 ASPH. | Kodak Portra 160

People at the Getty

When it comes to photography and museums I typically find myself more interested in the visitors than the actual exhibition. It’s a bit exaggerated I admit, however, from a photographic standpoint there is nothing less interesting than photographing other people’s artwork. So even at the Getty I found myself taking more pictures of people than art.

Leica M Monochrom Typ 246 | Leica Summilux-M 50mm f/1.4 ASPH. | ISO 320 | 1/2000s | f/2

Leica M Monochrom Typ 246 | Leica Summilux-M 50mm f/1.4 ASPH. | ISO 320 | 1/2000s | f/2

More Getty

As I mentioned in my previous post the architecture of The Getty is at least as interesting as the exhibitions themselves. Just strolling through the vast gardens and terraces was a pleasure on its own.

L2460559_2048px

Leica M Monochrom Typ 246 | Leica Summicron-M 35mm f/2 ASPH. | ISO 320 | 1/2000s | f/2.8

The Getty LA

No one can visit LA without seeing the Getty Center up on a hill in the Northwest of LA. Admittance to the museum itself is free, only if you arrive by car you pay for parking which is really fair. The architecture is stunning and has served as a futuristic backdrop for many movies. One of the latest was “Star Trek Into Darkness” where it featured Starfleet Headquarters.

I spent almost five hours there, and still wasn’t even remotely able to see everything. The site is huge and has a wide variety of contemporary and classic exhibitions on display. Because of that overwhelming breadth of exhibitions I decided to get on a guided tour which took about two hours and gave a great overview. I then digged a bit deeper in some of the exhibitions on my own which proved to be quite a good compromise.

I particularly enjoyed the tour through the Robert Mapplethorpe special exhibition. I think it’s save to say that he is one of my favorite photographers. Extremely controversial yet blessed with an incredibly strong sense for how pictures can trigger the viewer’s senses – from a content perspective but also lighting and composition.

Over the next days I will be posting more pictures of The Getty Center. So make sure you check back regularly (or subscribe).